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chief architects of american foreign policy. the leadership lecture series was established by ambassador xu cobb to commemorate her husband, chuck birthday. please join me in recognizing sue and chuck for 25 years of providing the university of miami community with the opportunity to host insightful and a provocative leaders from all walks of life. [applause] >> i also want the students to thank them for generously donating 300 secretary rice's very big books which were given to the first 300 students who attended this year's event. [applause] >> the university takes no credit for doing this. i want to thank our very good friend of the books and books, the university met with him recently to discuss launching a new partnership to bring speakers to the campus and one week later he called to say we are going to have an opportunity to host the secretaries first public tour event. i think this is the beginning of a beautiful relationship. thank you very much. [applause] >> now they have sponsored other distinguished speakers, the founder ross perot, the commissioner david stern, david gergen
prospectus, visit etrade.com/mutualfunds. >>> to his first major foreign policy address, john kerry said the biggest threat may end up to bring the u.s. to itself. speaking at the university of virginia, warning that the dysfunction in washington when it comes to the economy hurt his credibility. we also said in the global world, there is no longer anything foreign about foreign policy. take a look. >> how we conduct our foreign policy matters more than ever before to our everyday lives. to the opportunities of all the students i met standing outside, whatever year they are here, thinking about the future. it's important not just in terms of the threats we face, but the products that we buy, the goods that we sell and the opportunity that we provide for economic growth and vitality. it's not just about whether we will be compelled to send our troops to another battle, but whether we will be able to send graduates into a thriving workforce. >> joining me now is national security reporter brian bender and former ambassador to greece. it's good to have you here. i want to start with you. wh
. >> never before in our history have we been so interconnected with the rest of the world. >> foreign policy is actually not foreign. >> america has faced great hardship before and each time we have risen to the challenge. >> the ultimate test is to move our society from where it is to where it has never been. >> join us as we explore today's most critical global issues, join us for great decisions. >> great decisions is produced by the foreign policy association, inspiring americans to learn more about the world. sponsorship of great decisions is provided by credit suisse, eni, the hurford foundation, and pricewaterhousecoopers llp. >> coming up next: joint strike: nato and the u.s. in the 21st century. (instrumental music) >> in washington the united states breaks a 170-year-old tradition as it joins 11 nations in the signing of the atlantic defense treaty. president truman keynotes our position, which for the first time binds this country to a military agreement during days of peace. >> if there is anything certain today, if there is anything inevitable in the future it is the will
magazine" the latest from david ignatius of the "washington post," tom ricks of "foreign policy," and state department correspondent margaret brennan. we'll round it up on the with amy walt are aim amy walter, michael gerson, and our political director john dickerson. from out in space to here on earth, this is "face the nation." captioning sponsored by cbs from cbs news in washington, "face the nation" with bob schieffer. >> schieffer: and good morning, again on a day when there is no shortage of questions. we welcome dennis mcdonough president obama's me chief of staff, who i presume has brought many answers with him this morning. nice to have you. >> thanks for having me, bob. i'm really looking forward to it. >> schieffer: the sequester these draconian across-the-board spending cuts that are supposed to go into effect march 1. it appears to me that this is anything to happen. it looks to as if both the president and the congressional leaders have given up on each other. can this possibly happen? >> well, we've not give know up on this, bob and the reason we've not given up on this is be
'll defer that judgment to history. as to the comment i made about the most dangerous foreign policy decision since vietnam was about not just the surge, but the overall war of choice going into iraq. >> ah. not just about the surge, it was about the overall war of choice going into iraq. right. so is john mccain trying to relitigate that? the overall war of choice going into iraq? is he trying to relitigate that the decision to go into iraq was a disaster? yes, actually, yes. that is what this is all about, an effort to rehabilitate the iraq war in the american mind, to make it seem like it was success, or at least that it wasn't a bad idea, or at least that it wasn't the biggest foreign policy disaster since vietnam, or at least that it wasn't a scandal that ought to scar everybody associated with it in american politics for the rest of their careers. and because being wrong about the iraq war was not just an individual scandal, but a big scandal, this ends up being a big project, this revisionist history, until we come clean about this. until we get honest about it. until we can d
policy priorities and the importance of foreign aid. he will be introduced by the president of the university of virginia, teresa sullivan. this speech is ahead of a 10-day trip by the secretary to the u.k., germany, france, italy, turkey, and other companies -- countries, wrapping up in the united emirates and qatar, next week. later today he will meet with the president about that trip, at the white house at 4:00 p.m. eastern. secretaire states kerry next. after he's done, we will open up our phone lines to get your reaction by phone and by twitter on your foreign policy priorities. that will be after the speech this afternoon. president's nominee for secretary of defense, the senate will be back next week. house as well. debate resuming on the nomination of former nebraska senator chuck hagel to be defense secretary. the house and senate returning next monday, february 25. [applause] >> good morning. i am teresa sullivan, president of the university of virginia. a warm welcome to senator tim kaine, representative robert third period our guest from the state department as
policy front, some of the best foreign policy reporters in the business. david ignatius is with the "washington post," of course. tom ricks used to work for the "poat" is now contributing editor to "foreign policy" magazine and margaret brennan is our cbs news state department correspondent. before we get to foreign subjects here on earth, i want to talk about matters from outer space, and that meteorite that fell over siberia and injured over 1,000 people. so we're going back to new york to talk with the science editor and senior editor of "time" magazine jeffrey chewinger. jeffrey, let me start with the obvious. this thing caught our attention. there's no question about that. should we be worried about this? do these things pose a danger to those of us here on earth? >> well, they do and they don't. there's some comfort to be takenarchs we report in "time" magazine this week, that the earth has been playing in traffic for about 4 billion years now especially the time calmed the heavy bombardment period when the solar system hadn't quite acreeded yet. even today, every
with republicans wanting to flex their muscle on foreign policy. they haven't had many victories in terms of a lot of foreign policy, a lot of their policies have been discreditted by what we have seen over the last years in terms of the prosecution of the war on terror. so i think that's it. but i also think obama didn't do himself any favors by picking hagel. in some ways he's the only guy that wants hagel. democrats are not that excited about having hagel there. republicans are not happy. they want to drag it out. chris: what are you hearing from your reporters? >> i think that's right. the sense is he will be confirmed but there's still more time so we don't know what could happen. something new could come out. >> absolutely. >> change. chris: i think there may be a brilliant strategy. slow it down, slow it down, hope something breaks. bad news comes out of the woodwork. let's talk about something coming up on the subject of the march 1 showdown known as sequester. you wrote your new e-book called "here's the deal" in part, quote, democrats have gone on record as accepting a much longer list o
on foreign policy or national security, but because this is the beginning of his second term, his second and his last term in office as president, usually presidents start to think about their legacy, their place in history. many presidents in the past have focused oreign policy, but judging from today's state of the union, maybe president obama wants to focus or emphasize more of his liberal or social agenda, like equality or empowering women, fighting poverty over foreign policy issues. >> president obama also used the state of the union to announce a sharp reduction in u.s. troop levels in afghanistan. 34,000 service personnel will return home by early next year. about half the number currently deployed to the country. some afghans have welcomed the prospect of more control over their own security you while others are concerned afghan soldiers are unprepared. is a spoexz person for the afghan defense ministry on wednesday expressed confidence that local forces are ready to lead combat operations. >> translator: the afghan defense ministry welcomes the decision by the u.s. to withdraw
again during his time in office. >> presidents also touched on foreign policy, praising u.s. soldiers stationed in afghanistan and promising them a speedy return home. >> the president of the united states. [applause] >> it is a washington ritual, long applause, handshakes, and hugs on both sides of the aisle. in his speech, obama focused clearly on domestic issues, among them, raising the minimum wage, reforming immigration, and modernizing the education system. he also address america's political third rail -- gun control. the president promised survivors of gun control violence he would pursue common-sense reform. in a short foreign policy segment of his speech, obama said that efforts were on the course to conclude afghan operations next year. turning to europe, he raised the prospect of a free-trade zone to encourage commerce with european union countries and believe fears his new asian focus would come at europe's expense -- the late -- belay fears. >> trade that is fair and free across the atlantic supports millions of good-paying american jobs. >> but in a bitterly divided was
from the president last night. i didn't hear a new initiative in foreign policy. i didn't hear a new initiative on domestic policy. i heard 20-some odd programs that won't cost a dime, sounded like a candy rock mountain to me, which i learned does not exist. were you surprised? >> that was a new proposal at least, but i'm not surprised or disappointed. i think -- lou: i love a happy american. >> he's doubling down on a liberal agenda should not be a surprise to anybody, especially you, lou. lou: well, i maintain my unanimity, objectivity, and, always, my hope, of course. we're going to change the subject very quickly. we're going to come back to why is the president, why did he decide to make israel -- interesting, the first trip, first foreign trip of his second term? the a-team has some skeptical outlook, i would say, critical judgments they apply on these things, well, judy does on foreign policy,nyway, not necessarily the minimum wage. back with the a-team in moments. stay with us. lou: back with the a-team, and i do want to turn, first, to the response. senator rubio, as i point
information about what the white house did during the benghazi attack. he told "foreign policy magazine," quote, we need to know what the president's conversations were. i would vote no on thursday to disclosure unless the information is provide. by tuesday, or almost every day of the week, he said the president has responded to his satisfaction. but he didn't vote for closure. here's his latest. watch. >> there are still questions outstanding. i believe that senators have the right to have those questions answered. the senators and i had questions today. but there are other questions. >> like can you give us a copy of every speech you every gave krks you give us a dollar-for-dollar assessment for every dollar you made? by ta way, if you don't, we're going to accuse you. and joy, by the way, you're younger than i am by many, many years. we went back and looked at the innuendo. i don't know what he's running for. people say attorney general. i don't know why he's -- >> yeah, he's not running for president because i think he was born in canada. you said earlier in your introduce, chris, t
as predi predictable as the speech itself. aaron david miller, you know, there was no foreign policy this week, and he called mr. obama the extricater in chief, a praise i rather liked, but other than that, i really found the commentary westbound quite dreary about a quite uninspiring and effective speech. >> the point is most liberal like these things. there's nothing in this particularly liberal. and it's gotten to the point that if you're a liberal you have to like every idea that barack obama has. and since 1980, i don't understand, like, why are-- the economy is turning around now and he wants to talk about raising the minimum wage? i mean, it just isn't-- this is not an inspiring reaction to what's going on. >> jon: cal. >> i wrote in a column this week, a higher authority to. and the president, the recycling old ideas. the guys are so deep in the tank with this guy if he came up they'd suffer from the bends. he didn't call the president a liar, but came close to it said all of his claims were fantastic. he mentioned head start. he wants pre-k, 3 to 4, and head start has been s
back to the election" rather than the point of view he has about foreign policy. >> we don't agree on very much in terms of foreign policy. when i think about the national security team that led to my comment that i thought the president was making second-rate choices, that goes to things like hagel for defense, susan rice to state, brennan for c.i.a.. >> brennan worked closely, was in the c.i.a. >> john was around when we were there. he didn't play a prominent role. that's really developed since he joined this administration. >> rose: but there are -- >> but there are people that could be appoint as director of c.i.a. folks like steve cap pass. i don't know if you know him? >> rose: i know him very well. >> talented guy, enormously respected. >> rose: retired from the c.i.a.. >> he has retired. they brought him back once before, we did. with people of that caliber available, i'm surprised you end up going with somebody like brennan. i just -- i come back to the proposition that it looks to me-- and speculative on my part, obviously, i'm not in the meetings-- that the president has
to different segments of foreign policy. there are fine scholars to do this type of work and their places here in washington d.c. spending time doing this. other our students you're interested in these things and what is the established orthodoxy today. there are plenty of opportunities thank there are plenty of opportunities thanks to heritage federal are available to find out where they are, how you apply and starting to work and starting to work and politics are policy with the institutional problems that i talk about. >> i am curious germany was the origin of social welfare that they have a strong economy. do you have any insight? >> i talk about that because germany is the allied air the modern welfare state as we know it the great lover of freedom he set up the welfare state because urban industrial workers were voting for the social democratic party. he thought how we deal with it? we show them we can take care of their needs it wasn't noble but how to buy a short circuit the growing support of large numbers of people that were a political party that did more market oriented thinking pe
through a list of other issues from energy to manufacturing, touched on foreign policy and at the end reached, i think it's fair to say, an emotional crescendo when he talked about gun violence in america and recognized a number of individuals there in the house chamber who have been touched by gun violence. either they're the survivors, surviving family members or who themselves have been victims of gun violence. mark, we were counting, i think, as he went through... i know i made some notes. almost a dozen new initiatives the president announced on everything from international trade to higher education to doing something about the voting experience in america. it seemed like the president was trying to inject some energy into his second term. >> i agree wu, judy. i just want to underline the emotional apex of the evening was undoubtedly the "deserve a vote" chant that the president led when he spoke on gun control and the need, making the argument that our police departments were outgunned by those with assault weapons with criminal intent. and i thought that a speech that quite fr
swayinger right now and a lot of confidence. and forepolicy, he's kind of outsourced foreign policy in the first term. he's insourcing it back in the whitehouse again. this is his foreign policy and he's running into controversy over the drone program right now. this is a foreign policy national security team that is much more implementers and not super stars in their own right. barack obama has got ownership. he doesn't seem to support the kind of cast he had four years ago. >> rose: mark halperin when you looked at the possibilities of dealing with republicans especially the sequester question, is there some sense that the administration kneeling confident has pulled it off? >> i'm more pessimistic about it than i've been since probably the president took office. these other issues -- >> rose: since he was re-elected. >> no, since he took office. put these other issues on the table. gun control and climate change. i don't think there's any chance of those move until and unless he gets a fiscal deal in part because the traffic won't bear other big big things. and also because i d
on the foreign- policy front. >> we can say with renewed confidence that the state of our union is strong. >> the president says there is unfinished business, worked to be done to strengthen. the middle strengthen >> and growing economy that creates good, middle-class jobs. that must be the north star that guide our efforts. >> he announced initiatives in infrastructure and housing and called on congress to adjust to gun violence. >> the families of newtown deserved a vote. >> let's get this done. send me a comprehensive immigration reform bill and i will sign it right away and america will be better for it. >> the president urged congress to address climate change. >> if congress will not act soon to protect the generations, i will. >> on deficit reduction, he reiterated. entitlement reiterated >> let's agree to keep the people's government open and pay our bills on time and always uphold the full faith and credit of the united states of america. >> the president announced a draw down of 40,000 trees from afghanistan. >> by the end of next year, our war in afghanistan will. be will >> he
of this committee strongly opposed president obama's foreign-policy. regardless of how we may feel about the president's policies, or float on senator hagel nomination will not change those policies. there is a risk here it is that the defeat of this domination will leave the department of defense leaderless at a time when we face in this budgetary challenges in our military is engaged in combat operations overseas. such an absence of senior leaders would be unlikely to benefit either our national defense or men and away uniform, and i would add, given the recent explosion of a nuclear device by north korea, the delay in adopting this nomination and approving it, i think, will send the exact wrong message to north korea. the president needs to have a secretary of defense in him he has stressed who will give him unvarnished advice, a person of integrity and one who has a personal understanding of the consequences of decisions relative to the use of military force. senator hagel certainly has those critically important qualifications, and he is well qualified to lead department of defense.
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 340 (some duplicates have been removed)